Why Patients Are Filing Da Vinci Robot Lawsuits

Staff Writer | March 7th, 2013

Da Vinci Robot Lawsuit The da Vinci Surgical Robot was designed to facilitate complicated surgeries. But according to patient reports, the state-of-the-art device may actually cause harm, often due to insufficiently trained surgeons. Reported complications include perforated and burned internal organs – and a lifetime of repercussions. Many injured patients have no choice but to contact New York medical malpractice lawyers to file a da Vinci Robot lawsuit to recover damages. Compensation secured through litigation can help cover medical bills and other expenses, so victims can begin rebuilding their lives.

What is da Vinci robotic surgery?

The FDA approved the da Vinci Surgical Robot in 2000. The surgical robotic assistant, which is manufactured by the California-based Intuitive Surgical, is designed to provide increased precision and less invasive surgical procedures. The promise to patients is less blood loss, smaller incisions, and other improvements to equal a faster, easier recovery from surgery.

The da Vinci Surgical Robot has four surgical arms, each of which is separately controlled through an electronic console. One of the arms holds two lenses and an endoscopic camera, while the other three perform procedures with instruments including scissors, a scalpel, and electrocautery tools. The cutting-edge device is designed to aid in surgeries involving:

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Endometriosis
  • Gall bladder removal
  • Gastric bypass
  • Heavy uterine bleeding
  • Hysterectomy
  • Kidney cancer and other kidney disorders
  • Obesity surgery
  • Prostate removal
  • Throat cancer

Problems with the da Vinci Robot

Within a few years of the robot’s debut, the FDA had already received complaints of serious injury. Patients reported perforated, burned and torn internal organs, as well as other severe complications. The resulting daVinci Robot lawsuits often allege that surgeons using the device were not properly trained. And evidence suggests these claims are true. A 2010 article published in The Wall Street Journal explained that Intuitive Surgical pays only for a two-day training course for just two surgeons per hospital, despite the fact that these surgeons report a high learning curve and the need for plenty of practice with the da Vinci Robot. In fact, the Reviews in Urology journal says that a surgeon requires at least 200 cases to become proficient with the da Vinci Robot. However, surgeons experienced in the robotic technology report that up to 700 cases may be require to achieve proficiency.

Nevertheless, most hospitals don’t perform that many da Vinci Robot surgeries in an entire year. And since they must pay for additional training, some surgeons fly solo on the device after only a few training cases. Intuitive Surgical charges $1 million to $2.5 million to purchase the device, and hospitals are responsible for about $140,000 in annual maintenance.

Injury may lead to a da Vinci Robot lawsuit

Patients who have been injured during da Vinci robotic surgery have two options: to live with their injuries and suffer the physical and financial implications of their botched surgeries alone; or file a da Vinci robot lawsuit to recover damages for their pain and suffering. Damages compensate for medical expenses related to surgical error, and can also cover the ongoing costs of lifestyle changes, lost wages, and other economic losses.

For individuals who have suffered harm due to medical mistakes including complications from da Vinci robotic surgery, the New York medical malpractice lawyers at The Sanders Firm can help. We have decades of experience in medical negligence litigation, and we’ll fight for your rights. If you don’t win your case, you owe us nothing. There’s no risk. Call today for your free legal consultation. We’re available toll-free at 1-800-FAIR-PLAY.


  1. da Vinci Robotic Surgery http://www.davincisurgery.com/

  2. Robotic Surgery Grows But So Do Questions http://articles.latimes.com/2011/oct/17/health/la-he-robotic-surgery-20111017